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Was The Gates Foundation Originally Called The Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Population Control?

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We investigate!

I love doing these investigations of popular topics going viral.

You know, a “fact check”…except we actually do it honestly and legitimately.

So, was the Gates Foundation originally called The Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Population Control?

A wild claim if true.

So is it true?

Well, perhaps parts.

Let me break it all down for you — and the fact that even parts appear to be true is extremely disturbing, don’t you think?

Here’s a video that has gone viral and started the discussion:

Similar posts here:

And here:

Some are saying the video is fake…

Others say the lady just “misspoke”.

I’ll let you decide.

But now let’s look deeper.

Let’s just do something very basic, and something you can reproduce on your own — at least until Google sees this and changes their search results on this (which I have almost no doubt will happen).

But here are the TOP TWO results you get in Google when you search for “institute for population control”.

Notice I didn’t search for anything related to Gates or his foundation.

But Google is confident enough to give me two Gates Institute links right at the top of the search results:

I’m not saying that’s proof, I’m just saying you can file that under “things that make you go hmmmmm”.

Here’s what does appear to be true, beyond any doubt: Bill Gates does operate a foundation named: The Bill and Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health.

That does not appear to be in dispute.

From The Gates Foundation itself:

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation today announced a $40 million commitment to the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health to build capacity for population and reproductive health programs in the developing world, where unintended pregnancies and unsafe childbearing are a major cause of illness and death.

The grant will significantly increase funding for the Bill and Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health, which trains leaders of reproductive health programs in developing countries; conducts reproductive health research, and transfers program technology, models, and practices.

There is an urgent need to improve reproductive health services in the developing world. It is estimated that 120 million women who want and need access to family planning services don’t have it. Every year, there are approximately 66 million unwanted pregnancies and 20 million unsafe abortions, the majority of which are in developing countries.

“We are tremendously grateful to the Gates Foundation,” said Alfred Sommer, M.D., MHS, dean of the School of Public Health. “The foundation’s vision and generosity will enable the Institute to continue the next phase of its important work of training and strengthening the reproductive health leadership of the developing world,” added Dr. Sommer.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health was established at the School of Public Health in 1999 with a $20 million grant from the Gates Foundation, following a successful pilot grant awarded to the School in 1997. Since its launch, the Institute has actively pursued its primary mission of developing and strengthening the capacity of individuals and institutions in the developing world to address their most pressing and overarching problems related to population, family planning, and reproductive health.
“Improving reproductive health services in developing countries could save millions of lives, but it requires stronger in-country human and institutional capacity,” said Helene Gayle, M.D., M.P.H., former Director of HIV, TB, and Reproductive Health for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. “We’re delighted to be able to help continue and expand the Institute’s pioneering work.”

Every publication I could find from that organization talks about supporting “population health” but never explains what they means by that.

For someone who has said before that he wants population reduction, then it appears “population health” may be just the latest buzz phrase they are using.

Remind you of anything?

Like a certain (now demolished) Georgia Monument that published the Satanic 10 Commandments with #1 being to “maintain humanity at 500 million people and below”?

Georgia Guidestones Exposed: “Maintain Humanity Under 500 Million People”

Ok now I get it: “population health” — right, sure Bill, thanks for that!

If that’s what you want, can we start with you?

You first and then we will re-evaluate the plan, ok?

As always, the final piece of my authentic fact-check is usually to see what the MSM “fact-checkers” have said.

Usually tells us just about all we need to know.

Their normal plan of operation is to find one small detail to focus on, claim that is not true, and then discredit the entire story as a result.

I wonder if they will use that same little trick here?

Let’s go to Reuters and find out.

Sure enough!

Here’s their headline: False claim: Gates Foundation has a “Center for Global Human Population Reduction” sign

How interesting!

Let’s read what Reuters posted:

A false claim on social media says the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has a sign reading “Center for Global Human Population Reduction” on its building exterior. The image circulating online has been digitally altered to include the words “Center for Global Human Population Reduction” on the Foundation’s building façade. In reality, this sign reads, “Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation”.

Examples of the manipulated photograph can be seen here and here .

Photographs of the actual Foundation’s exterior can be seen on Google maps ( goo.gl/maps/JX4WNH2QBgv3d6Qe6 ) and in news reports about the Foundation (examples here and here ).

The Gates Foundation confirmed to Reuters via email that the image in this claim was fake.

Amidst the new coronavirus outbreak, the Reuters Fact Check team has debunked multiple false claims circulating on social media about Bill Gates, visible here , here, and here .

VERDICT
False. The words “Center for Global Human Population Reduction” have been photoshopped to the Foundation’s exterior.

Ah, ok then!

So they’ve determined that a picture of a sign was Photoshopped and that no such sign ever existed, leaving the reader to assume the entire story is bogus.

But is it?

I’ve presented the evidence, you decide!

Oh and speaking of Bill Gates, maybe we need to investigate this next:

Charming!





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